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Author Topic: Pre-64 M 70 Win.  (Read 90 times)
Rooster
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Posts: 2933


« on: January 10, 2018, 05:43:29 PM »

 I mentioned on the What did you get for Christmas thread, that I had purchased a new deer rifle because my old '06 had quit shooting. It had gone from 1/2" groups to 3" groups and  sprayed the 3 shot groups around the bull. In looking over the material that came with the new Nosler rifle, they mentioned the need to be aware of the placement of the sling, sling swivel and sling swivel stud on the forend when shooting the gun from a bench, as damaging the sling swivel stud could damage the gun. So, I went to the old '06 to take off the sling and install it on the Nosler and what I found was a sling stud bent to about 30 degrees. A wooden stock, by the way. So there's my accuracy culprit. I think it's affected the bedding, but I'm betting that Hill Country Rifles can re-tune it. I'll take it up to San Antonio this spring. Interesting experience after 60 or so yrs. of shooting.

Rooster
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I can be just as angry at the jihadists for wanting to kill me, as they are angry with me for being an American.

Yo soy un Indio Americano

 Vayo con dios mi amigos en la fe

 Someday, the highest peak on the tallest mountain on earth, may be nothing more than a grain of sand on the beach.
vector001
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 06:46:06 PM »

well, that makes more sense.

honestly, i recoiled in horror at the thought of retiring a rifle, but kept my peace because it wasn't my business... especially a 30.06 or .308. - not an expert here, but i didn't get it....

lots of crappy stocks out there - Ruger and Savage have both come out with some great bedding solution in the last few years that cost nothing and keep shooting, meanwhile a lot of the custom houses stocks, particularly the composite ones, struck me as crap and i told them so to their faces at SHOT SHOW 2008. - as gently as possible....


a laminated bamboo stock with a stainless steel V-block would be pretty awesome.

vec
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Some people bring a knife to a gunfight and win.

Some people bring swim fins to the knife fight, watch the other idiots kill each other, then take their stuff and swim happily out of zombie range.
Rooster
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Posts: 2933


« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 08:53:34 PM »

 I intended to do something with it all along. But since I didn't know what was wrong with it I was frustrated. I knew that it had to go back to Hill Country Rifles which is a three hr. drive away. I had no idea what it was, or now is, going to cost and I just wanted something that worked. By the way, there aren't any cracks in the wood around the sling swivel stud, I don't know about the barrel channel. The jolt or jolts, has knocked something out of line and HRC can either fix it or, since they use McMillan stocks, I'll buy one of his stocks and have HCR install my barreled action into it.

Rooster
« Last Edit: January 10, 2018, 11:29:26 PM by Rooster » Logged

I can be just as angry at the jihadists for wanting to kill me, as they are angry with me for being an American.

Yo soy un Indio Americano

 Vayo con dios mi amigos en la fe

 Someday, the highest peak on the tallest mountain on earth, may be nothing more than a grain of sand on the beach.
Bill S
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Posts: 2656


« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2018, 10:37:37 AM »

How you did that?   Huh?

Up until you said you you bent a sling swivel stud, that was probably the one thing I haven't seen damaged on a rifle.

I figured you had done something like over tightened an action screw and crushed the wood fibers or had a hairline crack somewhere in the wrist, those are the most common culprits when an accurate rifle starts being bad.  And are almost impossible to spot without strong light, strong magnification and someone flexing the stock while you look.

Laminated bamboo is really hard to seal and once you do, gets rather heavy.  Believe it or not, birch, which is used on cheap .22's, if you laminate it and seal it, is probably the best wood.  Key phrase is if you seal it.  And stain it before sealing, it takes colors well.  More layers, more stable.  More layers, more weight.

I would avoid McMillian stocks.  They are a great stock but you will pay a pretty good premium for that name.  Look at some of the top of the line Boyds' and a couple others. 
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Rooster
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Posts: 2933


« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2018, 11:32:48 AM »

 I had never seen that happen before either. What caused it was my resting the forearm of the rifle on the forward rest (off of a concrete bench) with the sling and sling stud too close to the rest. So when fired, the rearward recoil drove the sling stud into the forward rest and bent it forwards at about 25 to 30 degrees. I'm guessing that the "event" caused a slight shift in the bedding. I hope, and because it's their business, and want to think, that HCR can adjust it back into shape with the factory wooden stock. I was sighting it in with the new Leupold scope and the last two rds. I fired were right at 1/2 in. at 100 yds with 1 rd. touching the X. I guess one of those rds. was a fateful rd. because I went back a few days later and it was shooting 3 in. groups at about 1:00, in  the eight and 9 ring and wouldn't do any better than that. You know how you are, you just tell yourself, something's gone wrong here and of course I didn't know what. Kind of an interesting experience, I've got to get the old '06 shooting again.

Rooster
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I can be just as angry at the jihadists for wanting to kill me, as they are angry with me for being an American.

Yo soy un Indio Americano

 Vayo con dios mi amigos en la fe

 Someday, the highest peak on the tallest mountain on earth, may be nothing more than a grain of sand on the beach.
vector001
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Posts: 9326



WWW
« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2018, 11:36:43 AM »

I intended to do something with it all along. But since I didn't know what was wrong with it I was frustrated. I knew that it had to go back to Hill Country Rifles which is a three hr. drive away. I had no idea what it was, or now is, going to cost and I just wanted something that worked. By the way, there aren't any cracks in the wood around the sling swivel stud, I don't know about the barrel channel. The jolt or jolts, has knocked something out of line and HRC can either fix it or, since they use McMillan stocks, I'll buy one of his stocks and have HCR install my barreled action into it.

Rooster

McMillan was who i was talking to at SHOT.

i think just bring it in and listen would be a good economic strategy.

vec
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Some people bring a knife to a gunfight and win.

Some people bring swim fins to the knife fight, watch the other idiots kill each other, then take their stuff and swim happily out of zombie range.
vector001
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Posts: 9326



WWW
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2018, 11:40:25 AM »

d to seal and once you do, gets rather heavy.  Believe it or not, birch, which is used on cheap .22's, if you laminate it and seal it, is probably the best wood.  Key phrase is if you seal it.  And stain it before sealing, it takes colors well.  More layers, more stable.  More layers, more weight.


i haven't seen bamboo stocks. i'd treat it like inorganic composite, and trap it.

then you could get to milling out the parts that are ineffective.

you don't need a lot of layers, or mass, or heavy, unengineered composite moosh (McMillan, at least last time i saw them).

vec
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Some people bring a knife to a gunfight and win.

Some people bring swim fins to the knife fight, watch the other idiots kill each other, then take their stuff and swim happily out of zombie range.
Bill S
*****
Posts: 2656


« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 07:45:18 PM »

The fibers in bamboo are basically long narrow tubes.  You have to fill those suckers up or they will stretch and flex, which is OK for flooring, good for structural support and great for bows but not so hot for a stock.  Not sure how the bamboo would stand up to the recoil lug and action screws compressing during recoil.

McMillians stuff tends to be on the heavy side, it's mostly for carrying from the car to the range or for young hard charging Marines to lug around.

Laminates are usually heavier than standard wood, the glue lines are heavier than an equal volume of stock wood.  There are heavier woods out there, but they usually aren't used as rifle stocks.

There's a guy in South Carolina that makes super light bean field guns, and I can't remember his name.  He guarantees sub minutes of angle in a rifle about as heavy as a butterfly fa** or he will cut the rifle and stock in half with a bandsaw.  Which he has done several times.  He refuses to put his name on a rifle that doesn't shoot as well as he advertises.  Be prepared to sell a kidney and wait for a year plus.
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Rooster
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Posts: 2933


« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 08:03:54 PM »

 Not much help, I'll try to check it out in a minute, but I think it's Garrett or Barrett. one of them two sells hot Ammo from here in Texas, .44 Mag and I think 45/70.

Rooster
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I can be just as angry at the jihadists for wanting to kill me, as they are angry with me for being an American.

Yo soy un Indio Americano

 Vayo con dios mi amigos en la fe

 Someday, the highest peak on the tallest mountain on earth, may be nothing more than a grain of sand on the beach.
Rooster
*****
Posts: 2933


« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 08:13:13 PM »

 Jarrett Rifles in S.C. and the Beanfield is a cool $6000.00, one of his least expensive models.

Rooster
Logged

I can be just as angry at the jihadists for wanting to kill me, as they are angry with me for being an American.

Yo soy un Indio Americano

 Vayo con dios mi amigos en la fe

 Someday, the highest peak on the tallest mountain on earth, may be nothing more than a grain of sand on the beach.
deerstalker
*****
Posts: 7416


« Reply #10 on: January 12, 2018, 08:18:14 PM »


 Jarrett Rifles in S.C. and the Beanfield is a cool $6000.00, one of his least expensive models.



 

http://www.jarrettrifles.com/
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