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Author Topic: Learning about Mushrooms  (Read 1305 times)
Christopher Nyerges
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« on: May 17, 2016, 01:47:21 AM »

Just posted an article on "Learning about Mushrooms."   The book pictured, "California Mushrooms," is an excellent book, even way beyond California's borders.
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deerstalker
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« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2016, 02:34:41 AM »

 

http://dirttime.com/learning-about-mushroom

Mycology is a fascinating subject, but I've never really come to terms with it in the field.

We had some deaths where I live in recent years from Death Cap Mushrooms ....Amanita Phalloides

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_phalloides

"Symptoms of Death Cap mushroom poisoning generally occur 624 hours or more after ingestion of mushrooms and include stomach pains, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.

Symptoms may subside for 12 days giving a false impression of recovery. However, by this stage the toxin will have already caused serious liver damage. Liver failure and death may occur."



 
« Last Edit: May 17, 2016, 02:45:24 AM by deerstalker » Logged
Christopher Nyerges
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2016, 01:11:43 PM »

Yes, you need to go slow and carefully learn mushrooms one at a time. I eat certain ones, but I have lost the desire to "experiment," since that may include vomitting....

I always roll my eyes when someone comes to my wild food outings and asks something like, "How many classes do I need to take before I don't have to go to the supermarket anymore? I am taking this class to save money?"  My answer: You're taking the wrong class. If you want to save money on food ASAP, then start using coupons, go to the 99 cent store, and grow a garden.  Yes, you can start eating chickweed in salads when you learn about it, and then you add lamb's quarter for soup and egg dishes when you learn about it, and then you learn about this and then you learn about that, but it all takes time.  IF you're doing it to "save money quickly," you will be disappointed.
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vector001
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« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2016, 01:30:39 PM »

Yes, you need to go slow and carefully learn mushrooms one at a time. I eat certain ones, but I have lost the desire to "experiment," since that may include vomitting....

I always roll my eyes when someone comes to my wild food outings and asks something like, "How many classes do I need to take before I don't have to go to the supermarket anymore? I am taking this class to save money?"  My answer: You're taking the wrong class. If you want to save money on food ASAP, then start using coupons, go to the 99 cent store, and grow a garden.  Yes, you can start eating chickweed in salads when you learn about it, and then you add lamb's quarter for soup and egg dishes when you learn about it, and then you learn about this and then you learn about that, but it all takes time.  IF you're doing it to "save money quickly," you will be disappointed.

i imagine you demonstrate transplanting in your classes, brother.

vec
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deerstalker
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« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2016, 08:07:51 PM »


i imagine you demonstrate transplanting in your classes, brother.

vec


Plants & fungi or livers Huh?

The recommended treatment for Amanita Phalloides poisoning is a liver transplant

"Chef Liu Jun, 38, who made the meal at the Chinese bistro in the Harmonie German Club, and a Chinese woman, Tsou Hsiang, 52, died from liver failure in a Sydney hospital while waiting for transplants."

http://www.smh.com.au/national/deadly-mushroom-meal-was-made-in-a-restaurant-kitchen-20120105-1pn3g.html

 


« Last Edit: May 17, 2016, 08:35:55 PM by deerstalker » Logged
deerstalker
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« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2016, 08:31:30 PM »


IF you're doing it to "save money quickly," you will be disappointed.


A bit like shooting & archery - archery is not always the cheapest way to put a rabbit on the table.
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vector001
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2016, 11:09:00 PM »


IF you're doing it to "save money quickly," you will be disappointed.


A bit like shooting & archery - archery is not always the cheapest way to put a rabbit on the table.

primitive archery is.

vec
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Some people bring a knife to a gunfight and win.

Some people bring swim fins to the knife fight, watch the other idiots kill each other, then take their stuff and swim happily out of zombie range.
deerstalker
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Posts: 7119


« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2016, 11:41:27 PM »


IF you're doing it to "save money quickly," you will be disappointed.


A bit like shooting & archery - archery is not always the cheapest way to put a rabbit on the table.

primitive archery is.

vec


Sure can be  

I guess that depends on your hourly rate etc. though Wink Cheesy

i.e. (cost of equipment + consumables) + (... hrs @ $ ... per hr) divided by (Kgs of rabbit harvested) = price per kilo

.22LR is cheap (or used to be)

Reminds me of Alan case for Bics v/s ferro rods etc Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: May 19, 2016, 06:00:00 AM by deerstalker » Logged
deerstalker
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2016, 05:01:59 AM »

How about truffles Christopher??

http://www.dirttimeforum.com/index.php?topic=6727.0
« Last Edit: May 18, 2016, 05:25:35 AM by deerstalker » Logged
Dude McLean
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« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2016, 03:32:04 PM »



 personally i do not id the hrooms because i do not for the most part eat them... i never got into the mushrooms in the wild too easy to goof up for me not enough return for the chance .. so pass,, but thats just me..


 Dude
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deerstalker
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« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2016, 07:02:07 PM »


 personally i do not id the hrooms because i do not for the most part eat them... i never got into the mushrooms in the wild too easy to goof up for me not enough return for the chance .. so pass,, but thats just me..

 Dude

I'd like to come up to speed on mushrooms, because I do eat them - (so far only the store bought varieties)........

but also because more and more is now being understood about their essential role within their respective ecosystems.

 

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Christopher Nyerges
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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2016, 12:45:34 AM »

Truffles?  I recall when i learned about them back in the 70s.  I was at a UCLA Extension class, held in Bob Tally's home in west LA somewhere. He got a call that someone was spotting truffles and many in the class practically fainted!  OK, so I finally had some. Yes, they are good, but not fantastic, and nothing I'd pay an arm and a leg for.  Plus, it is nearly impossible to find since they are entirely underground, and guys actually use pigs to hunt them.

As for getting up to speed, there really are a few dozen good ones that everyone should know. My publisher stiill wants me to do a book on them, and maybe one day I will, but it will be VERY specific mushrooms. I should have an introductory article on mushrooms in the August American Survival Guide.

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deerstalker
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« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2016, 01:01:16 AM »


Yes, they are good, but not fantastic, and nothing I'd pay an arm and a leg for.  

Plus, it is nearly impossible to find since they are entirely underground, and guys actually use pigs to hunt them.



Round here they use dogs.

Good truffle dogs are worth a fortune.

It's just one more thing I've not done yet, I've seen truffles but never eaten one.

We have a local festival based around them.

Lots of native animals rely on them, I've heard that there's thousands of varieties.

http://www.amazon.com/Field-Guide-North-American-Truffles/dp/1580088627/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_y

 
« Last Edit: May 19, 2016, 01:25:28 AM by deerstalker » Logged
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