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Author Topic: Automobile Survival Kit  (Read 1981 times)
vector001
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« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2016, 05:13:42 PM »

Back when I had my beautiful pit bull cross, my truck was never locked...

It's fun to watch thugs eyes get big as platters when faced with a snarling set of teeth.

sounds familiar.


an all black chow/pitbull with a human brain is pretty fun to leave in a car downtown.

i miss The Ouza every day.

vec
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Christopher Nyerges
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« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2016, 08:01:15 PM »

It's very interesting to note what Vec regards as "fun."  But yes, crime can be defeated, we just have to do it, and not think that it's someone else's job.  Everyone might benefit from reading a book like "Lucifer's Hammer," (and others) where the post -apocalyptic society got very real again, and thugs and criminals were dealt with quickly and simply.  They just "disappeared," and life went on.  Oh, also "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress," and "Earth Abides," etc. We may all see the pendulum swing again in our lifetimes....
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Fuer Grissa Ost Drauka
Lynch Mob
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« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2016, 08:56:04 PM »

Ugh. Earth Abides was a slog to read. I can't understand the accolades that it received.


It's fun to watch thugs eyes get big as platters when faced with a snarling set of teeth.
As for my pit, she wouldn't make a sound, just stare intently at whomever might be showing interest in my stuff.
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Pacifism is the abdication of life.()
Civility is over-rated.()
The cure for anything is salt water- sweat, tears, or the sea.
-Isak Dinesen.
Dude McLean
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« Reply #18 on: January 08, 2016, 08:03:09 PM »



 was getting my motorhome serviced , forgot my Akita was in the home , the serrvice guy did the fastest exits ever...

 would leave her in the home when we went someplace where i could not take a dog... she would sit in the drivers seat and just looked at ya , that was enough... she scared the crap out of many peeps..miss that dog so much...


 Dude. 
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I have been where the hand of man has never set foot...
I'm not in  here with you , you are in here with me!...
 Of course I'm out of my mind , it's dark and scary in there...
Be a DirtBag and Fill it by Owning the Skills...
http://dirttimedude.blogspot.com visit my blog
"I have sat in the front row of hell and spit in the devils eye, first the right then the left.
 I have lived my life in such a manner that when I roll out of bed in the morning and my feet hit the floor , the devils reaction is .. oh shit!!.. he's awake!!!.
Quill
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« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2016, 09:48:05 PM »

Had a Boxer German Shepherd cross that would use that window Crack to try chew passers-by that walk to close. The mastiff took up most the truck box so he just stood up and down and people made wide that space between them as they walked by. The Boxer didn't like black people either and I have no idea why. I had from a pup and there were none closer than 20 miles and they didn't wander to my area in those days. I was on a trip with him when he first saw any black people. There was a cleaning lady that crossed in front to go clean a room while I walked him before hitting the road. I felt him lunge for her. That choke collar saved her. I yanked him back. She never knew what happened. He was totally sudden and made no sound. When in the car if anyone was to close they knew in a hurry but on ground he would go for someone like a lion hunting. That trip difficult because I went all over the south. Dogs sense what we don't know. Even the mastiff slide between my MIL and FIL. He would make him follow at the back of the ine. Hard to plump the reason but has to do with loyalty.
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What's over the next hill?
Fuer Grissa Ost Drauka
Lynch Mob
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« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2016, 02:33:53 AM »

I've known a number of racist dogs. Cracks me up every time I come across one. And, FWIW, I've known enough that no race is excluded as far as I can tell.
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Pacifism is the abdication of life.()
Civility is over-rated.()
The cure for anything is salt water- sweat, tears, or the sea.
-Isak Dinesen.
backwoodstrails
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« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2016, 06:02:39 AM »

Had a dog trainer once tell me - what dogs are not exposed to while young (maybe 3 to 4 months) they will either be scared of or want to attack. He specifically mentioned black people as an example
while telling me about  this, seeing as a lot of dogs raised in white neighborhoods don't see blacks until past this stage.

It's not just race either, the reason this came up is because I had a dog that always wanted to attack midgets, seriously midgets! The trainer said it was my fault
as I had not exposed the dog to midgets when he was young......Another thing I have to put on my "to do" list!

I can see the same thing being true with a dog that has been mistreated by a particular type of people while young. This seems to
come up with kids quite a bit. Sometimes young kids are rough with and can hurt puppies then the dog seems to no longer like kids.
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I thoroughly disapprove of duels. I consider them unwise and I know they are dangerous. Also, sinful. If a man should challenge me, I would take him kindly and forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet retired spot and kill him.
- Autobiography of Mark Twain
deerstalker
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Posts: 6333


« Reply #22 on: January 09, 2016, 06:57:17 AM »


Had a dog trainer once tell me - what dogs are not exposed to while young (maybe 3 to 4 months) they will either be scared of or want to attack.
 
I can see the same thing being true with a dog that has been mistreated by a particular type of people while young.

This seems to come up with kids quite a bit.

Sometimes young kids are rough with and can hurt puppies then the dog seems to no longer like kids.



Not Dogs but interesting........

http://www.grandin.com/behaviour/principles/principles.html

"Good First Experiences Important

For both horses and cattle it's important that their first experiences with something new be good. The horse that "blew up" when it first experienced trotting may always have a tendency to buck or jump when it changes gaits from a walk to a trot.

A fear of the scary experience of starting to trot may be formed. If this horse continues to have trotting problems, changing the saddle so that trotting feels different may help avoid triggering the fear memory.

Research with rats shows the powerful negative effect of a bad first experience. If a rat was shocked the first time it entered a new corridor in a maze, it would never enter that corridor again. However, if it entered the corridor several times without getting a shock, it would still enter the same corridor after it had had a shock.

Likewise, a horse's first experience with a trailer should be a good one and the first experience cattle have in a new corral should be something positive, such as being fed.

If the first experience is negative, the animals may become permanently afraid of trailers or corrals. First experiences make a big impression on prey species animals like cattle and horses.

The paradox about novelty is that it's scary if suddenly thrust on an animal. But, it is attractive if an animal is allowed to voluntarily approach it.

A clip board or box placed in a field or pen will attract both cattle and horses. They'll approach, poke and sniff. But if the wind moves the paper, the animal quickly backs away.

The most excitable, flighty cattle and horses are the ones that will be most attracted to a novel object in their environment, but they will be the first ones to run away if the object moves.

Excitable animals are more aware of their surroundings than calm, placid animals. Many trainers feel that the more spirited (excitable) horses are smarter.

People working with cattle and horses will have an easier time training and working with them if they understand how genetic factors interact with experience. The basic principle is that animals with flighty, excitable genetics must be introduced more gradually to new things than an animal with a calm placid temperament. "


 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2016, 07:09:29 AM by deerstalker » Logged
deerstalker
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Posts: 6333


« Reply #23 on: January 09, 2016, 07:07:01 AM »


As for my pit, she wouldn't make a sound, just stare intently at whomever might be showing interest in my stuff.


For much of my working life I had my dogs with me, workshop, office, vehicle, site & home of course.

My trucks generally had steel table top or tipper bodies so could be hot under foot in summer.

One Doberman in particular would hop of and wait for me under the vehicle, if anyone approached he'd poke his head out, they would see he wasn't tethered and give him a wide berth - worked with almost everyone except 14 YO girls who tended to come straight over to give him a cuddle. Cheesy

 
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Quill
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« Reply #24 on: January 09, 2016, 08:08:15 AM »

Quote
I can see the same thing being true with a dog that has been mistreated by a particular type of people while young.

I have read that back in the early frontier days, some guys would get a new dog and hire an indian to beat for several days. Those dogs never let natives sneak up on their masters. I read a book from a guy that rode the rails. He had a large dog with him. Hired a stranger to work on the dog with a rolled newspaper or something. He could set his pack by the dog for hours and no one could come near it. Whether you like the technique or not it works. Personally I think there are better ways to train these days.

Cattle are funny critters that seem brainless at times but they can be as wild or gentle as a dog. Horses well they need to be sacked out to be worth a hoot. Still one that has been wild and then broke to ride keep their prey instincts and can be like a blood hound.
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What's over the next hill?
vector001
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« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2016, 04:19:56 PM »


Had a dog trainer once tell me - what dogs are not exposed to while young (maybe 3 to 4 months) they will either be scared of or want to attack.
 
I can see the same thing being true with a dog that has been mistreated by a particular type of people while young.

This seems to come up with kids quite a bit.

Sometimes young kids are rough with and can hurt puppies then the dog seems to no longer like kids.



Not Dogs but interesting........

http://www.grandin.com/behaviour/principles/principles.html

"Good First Experiences Important

For both horses and cattle it's important that their first experiences with something new be good. The horse that "blew up" when it first experienced trotting may always have a tendency to buck or jump when it changes gaits from a walk to a trot.

A fear of the scary experience of starting to trot may be formed. If this horse continues to have trotting problems, changing the saddle so that trotting feels different may help avoid triggering the fear memory.

Research with rats shows the powerful negative effect of a bad first experience. If a rat was shocked the first time it entered a new corridor in a maze, it would never enter that corridor again. However, if it entered the corridor several times without getting a shock, it would still enter the same corridor after it had had a shock.

Likewise, a horse's first experience with a trailer should be a good one and the first experience cattle have in a new corral should be something positive, such as being fed.

If the first experience is negative, the animals may become permanently afraid of trailers or corrals. First experiences make a big impression on prey species animals like cattle and horses.

The paradox about novelty is that it's scary if suddenly thrust on an animal. But, it is attractive if an animal is allowed to voluntarily approach it.

A clip board or box placed in a field or pen will attract both cattle and horses. They'll approach, poke and sniff. But if the wind moves the paper, the animal quickly backs away.

The most excitable, flighty cattle and horses are the ones that will be most attracted to a novel object in their environment, but they will be the first ones to run away if the object moves.

Excitable animals are more aware of their surroundings than calm, placid animals. Many trainers feel that the more spirited (excitable) horses are smarter.

People working with cattle and horses will have an easier time training and working with them if they understand how genetic factors interact with experience. The basic principle is that animals with flighty, excitable genetics must be introduced more gradually to new things than an animal with a calm placid temperament. "


 


....and this is a prime phenomenon/example  of why i hate psychology, with religion (not God, nor Dog) being a close second - because hardly NO ONE USES IT TO FIX ANYTHING THEMSELVES! - Marines, excepted, go one better - i was paralyses-level when it came to high things and fire. so they caught me on fire and threw me off a tower. - that experience taught me so much about what Bullshit was, and what it wasn't. had some cool grill marks for years from getting caught on fire that you could see when i got cold, they are hidden by newer scars now....

i can cure anyone of any mental condition with two days, a car battery, jumper cables and a wet sponge, if the police aren't involved and the subject's IQ is above Forest Gump's.  Grin

vec
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Contact -
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deerstalker
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Posts: 6333


« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2016, 06:36:41 PM »


........i was paralyses-level when it came to high things and fire. so they caught me on fire and threw me off a tower. - that experience taught me so much about what Bullshit was, and what it wasn't.

vec

What doesn't kill ya ay...........?

Temple makes a lot of her income designing abattoirs, so probably doesn't get a lot of time with each subject animal to correct bad behaviour.

More like......... the Russian troops in WWII (with short combat life expectations) being issued no rifle but 5 rounds to use when they got one from a dead comrade .......... where the training budget was limited.

Prevention of bad habits is generally preferable to cure IMO assuming there's the opportunity .

It bet it would all be very different if people donated their newborns to the US Marine Corps at birth Huh? Wink  
« Last Edit: January 09, 2016, 10:44:08 PM by deerstalker » Logged
Dude McLean
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« Reply #27 on: January 09, 2016, 07:27:12 PM »



 ho my Akita did not like motorcycles   or uniforms or hoodies and homeless peeps... would go nutso on them... so cops and any other uniforms was a target.. if yopu had a hoodie up over your head that was a problem...also did not like a ragtop ... little dogs enchanted her and they would nip at her and bark but were tolerated... same with babies...  and then thetre wetre some people she just did not like ... anyone over six feet she had a problem with... sometimes it was funny sometimes not so much... I was stopped at a road block and the cop walked over to truck my Akita tried to get him... if the window had been down not sure I would have been able to stop her.. 120 pounds is hard to handle... thyis was all her own doing as she was very social as many here knew her...

 Dude
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I have been where the hand of man has never set foot...
I'm not in  here with you , you are in here with me!...
 Of course I'm out of my mind , it's dark and scary in there...
Be a DirtBag and Fill it by Owning the Skills...
http://dirttimedude.blogspot.com visit my blog
"I have sat in the front row of hell and spit in the devils eye, first the right then the left.
 I have lived my life in such a manner that when I roll out of bed in the morning and my feet hit the floor , the devils reaction is .. oh shit!!.. he's awake!!!.
Christopher Nyerges
Lynch Mob
*****
Posts: 923


« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2016, 12:13:15 AM »

I agree Dude, dogs are very smart, and very perceptive. I think an average homeless person would have such a smell that the dog would at least notice, and have some reaction. I have seen my pitbull (years ago, Ramah), pick someone out in a crowd, while we were driving!!, and start furiously barking at one specific person. We'd slow, but usually could not figure out what the dog saw/felt.  As I say, you cannot fool dogs or children.
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